Trichinosis B75.x0

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

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Last updated on: 29.10.2020

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Synonym(s)

Trichinosis

History
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Owen and Paget, 1835; Virchow, 1859; von Zenker, 1860

Definition
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Notifiable worm disease.

Pathogen
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Trichinella spiralis.

Occurrence/Epidemiology
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Worldwide spread. Rarely in Central Europe. Mostly sporadically occurring or in small epidemics.

Etiopathogenesis
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Absorption of the pathogens by consumption of larval pork. maturation of the worms in the small intestine. After 5 days: Birth of new larvae which penetrate the intestinal wall and enter the whole organism via the bloodstream.

Clinical features
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Fever, intestinal colic, diarrhea, muscle aches. Edema of the face (lid edema), palms of hands and feet; macular exanthema, subungual splinter hemorrhages.

Laboratory
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Eosinophilia, IgE increase; possible increase in serum creatinine kinase.

Differential diagnosis
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Internal therapy
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Albendazole (e.g. Eskazole Filmtbl.) 10-15 mg/kg bw daily in 2 daily doses or Mebendazole (Vermox Tbl.) 200-400 mg 3 times/day for 3 days, then 400-500 mg 3 times/day for 10 days Cave! Side effects, therefore follow exact dosage instructions!

For prevention of possible secondary disease symptoms accompanying therapy with 20-60 mg prednisone (e.g. Decortin Tbl.), in case of threatening complications initial, high-dose parenteral administration of up to 1 g.

Prophylaxis
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Sufficient cooking or frying of the meat.

Literature
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  1. Cortes-Blanco M et al (2002) Outbreak of trichinellosis in Caceres, Spain, December 2001-February 2002 Euro Surveill 7: 136-138
  2. Holstein A et al (1999) Father and son with muscle pain and loss of muscle strength. Acute trichinosis. Internist 40: 673-677
  3. Liu M et al (2002) Trichinellosis in China: epidemiology and control. Trends Parasitol 18: 553-556
  4. Owen R (1835) Description of a microscopic entozoon infesting the muscles of the human body. London Med Gaz 16: 125-127
  5. Roy SL (2003) Trichinellosis surveillance--United States, 1997-2001 MMWR Surveill Summ 52: 1-8
  6. Virchow R (1859) Recherches sur le developpement de la trichina spiralis (ce ver devient adulte dans l'intestin du chien). CR Seanc Acad Sci 49: 660-662
  7. Zenker FA (1860) On the trichinosis of humans. Arch Pathol Anat Physiol Klin Med 18: 561-572

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Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

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Last updated on: 29.10.2020