Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma D18.01

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

Co-Autor: Michael Hambardzumyan

All authors of this article

Last updated on: 06.08.2021

Dieser Artikel auf Deutsch

Synonym(s)

Hobnail hemangioma; Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma

History
This section has been translated automatically.

Santa Cruz and Aronberg, 1988

Definition
This section has been translated automatically.

Rare solitary hemangioma occurring at any age with a characteristic clinical aspect similar to a shooting target.

Localization
This section has been translated automatically.

Legs, arms, buttocks, hips, chest area. Rarely tongue and gingiva.

Clinical features
This section has been translated automatically.

Mostly solitary, 0.2-0.5 cm in Ø, red to brown-red papule/plaque, which in some cases (about 20%) is surrounded by a narrow pale halo and a larger brownish ring (shooting disc aspect). This halo may fade or recede with time. Spontaneous regression of the hemangioma is not uncommon. 'Target-like' hemangioma.

Shallow dark brown variants may lack cocard stratification, causing them to be misrecognized as melanocytic neoplasms.

Histology
This section has been translated automatically.

Biphasic growth:
  • Superficial dermis: dilated, lacunar, thin-walled vessels lined by prominent "hobnail" endothelia, few intraluminal erythrocytes. Erythrocyte extravasations and hemosiderin deposits are frequently present (see below clinic).
  • Deep dermis: slit-like vascular spaces and haemosiderin deposits located between compressed collagen bundles Smooth muscle actin-positive pericytes are missing (indication of lymphatic differentiation). No mitoses or nuclear atypia.

Differential diagnosis
This section has been translated automatically.

Therapy
This section has been translated automatically.

Excision, no risk of recurrence.

Literature
This section has been translated automatically.

  1. Al Dhaybi R et al (2012) Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangiomas (hobnail hemangiomas) are vascular lymphatic malformations: a study of 12 pediatric cases. J Am Acad Dermatol 66:116-120.
  2. Christenson LJ et al. Trauma-induced simulator of targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma. Am J Dermatopathol 23: 221-223.
  3. Cotell S et al (2003) What is your diagnosis? Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma. Cutis 72: 51-52
  4. Guillou L et al (1999) Hobnail hemangioma: A pseudomalignant vascular lesion with a reappraisal of targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma. Am J Surg Pathol 23: 97-105
  5. Gutte RM et al (2014) Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma. Indian Dermatol Online J 5: 559-560.
  6. Kakizaki P et al (2014) Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma - Case report. An Bras Dermatol 89:956-959.

  7. Rapini RP, Golitz LE (1990) Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma. J Cutan Pathol 17: 233-235.
  8. Santa Cruz DJ, Aronberg J (1988) Targetoid hemosiderotic hemangioma. J Am Acad Dermatol 19: 550-558.
  9. Zaballos P et al (2015) Dermoscopy of Targetoid Hemosiderotic Hemangioma: A Morphological Study of 35 Cases. Dermatology 231:339-344.

Disclaimer

Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

Authors

Last updated on: 06.08.2021