Stucco keratosis L82.x

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

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Last updated on: 12.01.2021

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Synonym(s)

keratoelastoidosis verrucosa; Stuccokeratosis; Verrucae dorsi manus et pedis

History
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Unna, 1894; Kocsard and Ofner, 1966

Definition
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(Frequent) occurring in light-damaged skin, usually little noticed, single or multiple, asymptomatic, harmless, flat or also wart-like elevated, benign neoplasms. People of advanced age. Stukkokeratoses can be scraped off without difficulty and painlessly with the fingernail, whereby only in the case of deeper scratching out a punctiform bleeding area remains. However, they recur in loco. No tendency to malignant degeneration. Note: This is probably a poorly pigmented or non-pigmented variant of verruca seborrhoica.

Manifestation
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Occurring at the age of 50 and older. No clear gender preference.

Localization
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Extremities, especially distal lower extremities (extensor sides of the lower legs, back and ankles) as well as the back of the hand and forearm extensor sides. The face and trunk are left out.

Clinical features
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Predominantly multiple, 0.3 - 1.5 cm, roundish or oval, flat raised, sharply defined, white, grey or light brown papules and/or plaques.

Rough, dry, whitish or dusty surface.

No subjective symptoms

A flaky leaf can be removed by scratching. Scratch marks in the lesions become whitish in colour.

Histology
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The fine tissue structure is identical to the hyperkeratotic type of Verruca seborrhoica with sawtooth papillomatosis and an often massive lamellar hyperkeratosis.

Differential diagnosis
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Therapy
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In case of cosmetic disorder removal with curettage or by desiccation. If necessary, an experiment with vaporization by laser (CO2 or Erbium-YAG laser).

Note(s)
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The term "stucco keratosis" was chosen as a pictorial term because the keratoses sit on the skin like stucco.

Literature
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  1. Bossong W (1971) Stuccokeratosis, a rare dermatosis? Z skin sexkr 46: 53-58
  2. Braun-Falco O et al (1978) Stucco keratoses. dermatologist 29: 573-577
  3. Kocsard E, Ofner F (1966) Keratoelastoidosis verrucosa of the extremities (stucco keratoses of the extremities). Dermatologica 133: 225-235
  4. Kocsard E, Carter JJ (1971) The papillomatous keratoses. The nature and differential diagnosis of stucco keratosis. Australas J Dermatol 12: 80-88
  5. Metz J et al (1970) Stuccokeratosis. A scarcely observed change in the aging skin. Z skin sexkr 45: 81-86
  6. Ruszczak Z et al (1968) Stuccokeratosis (Keratoelastoidosis verrucosa). Dermatologist 19: 360-363
  7. Stockfleth E et al (2000) Detection of human papillomavirus and response to topical 5% imiquimod in a case of stucco keratosis. Br J Dermatol 143: 846-850
  8. Unna PG (1894) The histopathology of skin diseases. A. Hirschwald, Berlin

Disclaimer

Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

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Last updated on: 12.01.2021