Infantile acrolocalized papulo-vesicular syndrome L44.4

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

Our authors

Last updated on: 29.10.2020

Dieser Artikel auf Deutsch

History
This section has been translated automatically.

Crosti and Gianotti, 1967

Definition
This section has been translated automatically.

Skin changes similar to Acrodermatitis papulosa eruptiva infantilis without accompanying viral hepatitis on the basis of other viral infections or preceding immune stimulation (vaccinations).

Etiopathogenesis
This section has been translated automatically.

Unknown, possibly infection-allergic dermatosis of polyätiological origin. Especially described in Epstein-Barr virus, Coxsackie B, cytomegaly, para-influenza virus infections. Occasional detection of Cocksackie-Virus A16 from throat rinsing water or stool.

Manifestation
This section has been translated automatically.

Occurs in childhood, especially in spring and autumn. Preferably infants of the male sex aged 2 to 6 years.

Localization
This section has been translated automatically.

Mainly cheeks, extremities, palmae and plantae, elbows, hollow of the knee, also trunk.

Clinical features
This section has been translated automatically.

Symmetrical exanthematic eruptions of hemispherical, succulent, pink to purple, papular, partially papulovesicular appearing efflorescences with possible hemorrhagic note. Tendency to confluence. Within a few days the eruptions rise from caudal to cranial: lower extremities (with recess of the popliteal fossa) > buttocks > trunk > extensor sides of the upper extremities (with recess of the crook of the arm) > face with recess of the periocular and nasolabial region. Polylymphadenitis, possibly lasting several months.

Histology
This section has been translated automatically.

Edema in the upper corium, spongiotic loosening, microbubbles, mild acanthosis with hyperkeratosis, papillary body edema. Fine tissue picture of chronic vasculitis.

Differential diagnosis
This section has been translated automatically.

External therapy
This section has been translated automatically.

Under blander external therapy, e.g. with lotio alba, usually healing within a few weeks. Otherwise symptomatic treatment of the virus infection.

Progression/forecast
This section has been translated automatically.

Mostly healing after 1-2 months, rarely relapses.

Literature
This section has been translated automatically.

  1. Baldarini U et al (1994) An epidemic of infantile papular acrodermatitis (Gianotti-Crosti syndrome) due to Epstein-Barr virus. Dermatology 188: 203-204
  2. Crone J et al (2002) Acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruption as the presenting sign of cystic fibrosis--case report and review of the literature. Eur J Pediatr 161: 475-478
  3. Crosti A, Gianotti F (1967) Infantile papular acrodermatitis and lymphoreticulotropic viruses. Minerva Dermatol 42: 264-278
  4. Haug S et al (2002) Gianotti-Crosti syndrome following immunization. dermatologist 53: 683-685
  5. Müller K, Heüveldop A, Schulz H (1990) Epstein-Barr virus-associated infantile acrolocalized papulo-vesicular syndrome (Gianotti-Crosti syndrome). Close to the skin Paed 3: 4-8
  6. Ricci G et al (2003) Gianotti-Crosti syndrome and allergic background. Acta Derm Venereol 83: 202-205
  7. Schopf RE (1995) Gianotti-Crosti syndrome in Epstein-Barr virus infection. dermatologist 46: 714-716
  8. Virgili A et al (2003) Acroangiodermatitis of amputation blunt. Eur J Dermatol 13: 402-403

Disclaimer

Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

Authors

Last updated on: 29.10.2020