Malvae sylvestris flos

Authors: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer, Prof. Dr. med. Martina Bacharach-Buhles

All authors of this article

Last updated on: 29.10.2020

Dieser Artikel auf Deutsch

Synonym(s)

Cheese poplar blossoms; Flores Malvae; mallow blossoms; Mallow leaves; Pink poplar blossoms

Definition
This section has been translated automatically.

Malvae flos (mallow blossoms) is a drug used in herbal medicinal products according to Commission E, inter alia, for the treatment of inflammation of mucous membranes and irritable stomach.

Ingredients
This section has been translated automatically.

Mallow blossoms or mallow leaves contain about 8% mucilage with acidic polysaccharides (ingredients: glucose, galactose, rhamnose) as main components. Furthermore anthocyanin dyes (e.g. malvin).

Effects
This section has been translated automatically.

Mallow blossoms or mallow leaves have a soothing effect.

Field of application/use
This section has been translated automatically.

Mallow blossoms or mallow leaves are used to treat inflammation of the mucous membranes in the mouth, stomach and throat or in dry, irritable coughs.

Dosage
This section has been translated automatically.

The daily dose of the drug, according to its preparation, is 5 g per day and is mostly taken in the form of infusions.

Tip: Prepare tea cold, boil briefly, allow to steep, strain through tea strainer after 10 minutes. Drink several times a day, possibly sweetened with honey.

Undesirable effects
This section has been translated automatically.

There are no known adverse effects.

Contraindication
This section has been translated automatically.

There are no known contraindications.

Interactions
This section has been translated automatically.

There are no known interactions with other drugs.

Trade names
This section has been translated automatically.

Only available in tea blends.

Note(s)
This section has been translated automatically.

Malvae sylvestris flos can also be used together with bay leaves to treat irritation of the gastrointestinal tract.

Literature
This section has been translated automatically.

  1. Schilcher H (2016) in: Guide to Phytotherapy, Urban & Fischer Verlag (2016) Munich, p. 213.
  2. Wiesenauer M (2016) PhytoPractice. Springer Medicine Publishing House Heidelberg, S.115-116