Graminis rhizoma

Authors: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer, Prof. Dr. med. Martina Bacharach-Buhles

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Last updated on: 29.10.2020

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Synonym(s)

Couch grass rootstock; rhizoma graminis

Definition
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Graminis rhizoma, also called couch grass rootstock, is a drug extracted from the dried rootstock of couch grass. The drug is used for the treatment of urinary tract problems and benign prostatic hyperplasia, among others, according to the monographs of HMPC, ESCOP and Commission E.

Ingredients
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Graminis rhizoma contains essential oil(thymol, carvacrol, carvone, agropyrene), saponins, tricitin (3 to 12 %) an inulin-like carbon hydrate, silicic acid, alkyl p-hydroxycinnamic acid ester, phytosterols and 36 % free fatty acids.

Effects
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Graminis rhizoma shows antimicrobial and diuretic effects. Especially agropyrene has an antifugal effect (Trichophyton species).

Field of application/use
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According to the previous monograph of Commission E, couch grass rootstock is used as a flushing therapy for inflammatory diseases of the urinary tract and as a preventive measure against renal gravel.
Further indications are irritable bladders, benign prostatic hyperplasia and bronchial catarrh.

The root extract is also used for "chronic skin diseases" e.g. chronic dermaitis. There is no scientific basis for this.

Under the INCI designation"Agropyron repens root extract" the root extract is used in cosmetic products.

Dosage
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The TD (daily dose) of the drug is between 6.0 and 9.0 g. The drug is mainly used in the form of tea preparations. A tincture (1:5) in 45% ethanol (ED 5-10ml 3x/day p.o.) is also suitable.

Undesirable effects
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Undesirable effects are not known.

Contraindication
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If cardiac or nephrogenic edema is present, flushing therapy should not be used.

Literature
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  1. Cha JD et al (2005) Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of Artemisia scoparia and A. capillaris. Planta Med 71:186 190.
  2. Joshi RK et al (2010) Phenyl alkynes rich essential oil of Artemisia capillaris. Nat Prod Commun 5:815-816.
  3. Schilcher H (2016) In: Guide to Phytotherapy, Urban & Fischer Verlag Munich, p. 244 f.
  4. Sharopov FS et al (2011) The essential oil of Artemisia scoparia from tajikistan is dominated by phenyldiacetylenes. Nat Prod Commun 6:119-122
  5. Solovev VN det al (1965) antibacterial activity of sysnthetic capillene (agropyrene) and capilline derivatives. Antibiotics 10:156-159.

Incoming links (2)

Agropyrene; Quecke gemeine;