Necrolytic acral erythema L99.8

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

All authors of this article

Last updated on: 18.12.2020

Dieser Artikel auf Deutsch

Synonym(s)

Acral necrolytic erythema; Necrolytic acral erythema

History
This section has been translated automatically.

el Darouti and Abu el Ela 1996

Definition
This section has been translated automatically.

Disease pattern belonging to thenecrolytic erythemas(erythema necrolyticum migrans, acrodermatitis enteropathica) (there is an overlap with acrodermatitis enteropathica due to the frequently detectable zinc deficiency) that is predominantly associated with hepatitis C infection (Dabas G et al. 2018).

Occurrence/Epidemiology
This section has been translated automatically.

The cases published to date relate predominantly to patients from Asia and Africa.

Etiopathogenesis
This section has been translated automatically.

Hepatitis C, zinc deficiency

Manifestation
This section has been translated automatically.

Mostly with Pat. in the third to fifth decade of life

Localization
This section has been translated automatically.

Exclusively acral on the back of the hand and the back of the foot; palms of the hands and soles of the feet are left out.

Clinical features
This section has been translated automatically.

Burning or itchy, slowly spreading, reddish plaques with adherent scaling, sometimes also blistering with later necrosis (Geria AN et al. 2009).

Laboratory
This section has been translated automatically.

HCV serology, zinc serum levels

Histology
This section has been translated automatically.

Psoriasiform aspect with strong dermal neutrophilic inflammation, parakeratosis, hyperkeratosis, infiltration of the epidermis by neutrophilic granulocytes.

Therapy
This section has been translated automatically.

Treatment of an existing hepatitis C. Compensation of a zinc deficiency, locally: glucocorticoid creams.

Note(s)
This section has been translated automatically.

Recently published cases without associated hepatitis C infection also suggest that other etiological relationships are possible (Srisuwanwattana P et al. 2017). Some authors doubt the entity of the clinical picture and suspect a clinical variant of the erythema necrolyticum migrans (necrolytic migratory erythema) (Nofal AA et al. 2005).

Literature
This section has been translated automatically.

  1. Dabas G et al (2018) Necrolytic acral erythema leading to diagnosis of chronic hepatitis C. Digestive and liver disease: official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver 50: 854
    Geria AN et al. (2009) Necrolytic acral erythema: a review of the literature. Cutis 83: 309-314.
  2. Nofal AA et al (2005) Necrolytic Acral Erythema: A Variant of Necrolytic Migratory Erythema or a Distinct Entity? Int J Dermatol 44: 916-921
  3. Srisuwanwattana P et al (2017) Necrolytic Acral Erythema in Seronegative Hepatitis C. Case reports in dermatology 9:69-73.

Disclaimer

Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

Authors

Last updated on: 18.12.2020