Microsporum canis

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

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Last updated on: 29.10.2020

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History
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Bodin, 1902

General definition
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Worldwide leading zoophilic dermatophyte whose source of infection is usually cats (recently, in the group of zoophilic dermatophytes M.canis is displaced by Arthoderma benhamiae of a Trichophyton species whose source of infection is often rodents e.g. guinea pigs).

Occurrence/Epidemiology
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Worldwide spread. Especially for pets like dogs, cats, hamsters, horses, monkeys, guinea pigs.

Manifestation
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For children aged 5-15 years with contact to pets (especially dogs, cats).

Clinical picture
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S.u. Tinea capitis superficialis, tinea corporis, tinea inguinalis, microspore. Starting on smooth skin with an itchy papule around which a pustular focus forms in a ring-shaped zone. When the capillitium is affected, usually the hair follicles are affected and the mycelium grows into the epidermis to a depth of about 0.2 mm. rearrangement of the hair with mycelium, so that infected hair becomes brittle and breaks off easily. Therefore, mechanical epilation is often very difficult. No infestation of the hair bulb.

Microscopy
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  • Fine long hyphae, few chlamydospores and rocket hyphae.
  • Microconidia: Often round or oval, acladium-shaped along the hyphae, length: 4-7 μm; width: 2-5 μm.
  • Macroconidia: Frequent and abundant, spindle-shaped with constrictions below both poles, spiny, rough-walled, bud-like sheath with 3-18 chambers (very rare on downy crops; numerous in granular areas), length: 60-120 μm, width: 10-20 μm.

Literature
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  1. Hay RJ et al (2001) Tinea capitis in Europe: new perspective on an old problem. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 15: 229-233
  2. of Gelderen de Komaid A et al (2002) Unusual presentation of Microsporum canis in human hair. Med Mycol 40: 419-423
  3. Silm H, Karelson M (2002) Terbinafine: efficacy and tolerability in young children with tinea capitis due to Microsporum canis. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 16: 228-230
  4. Uhrlaß S et al. (2015) Microsporum canis. dermatologist 66: 855-862

Disclaimer

Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

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Last updated on: 29.10.2020