Exanthema subitum B08.20

Author: Prof. Dr. med. Peter Altmeyer

Our authors

Last updated on: 29.10.2020

Dieser Artikel auf Deutsch

Synonym(s)

Pseudorubella; Roseola infantum; Rose rash of infants; sixth disease; Three-day fever

History
This section has been translated automatically.

Meigs and Pepper, 1870; Zahorsky, 1910

Definition
This section has been translated automatically.

Sporadically occurring, aerosol-spreading, characteristically lasting for 3 days ("three-day fever"), highly febrile, virus-induced "childhood disease" (HHV-6 (occasionally also HHV-7), a DNA virus from the herpes family) with permanent immunity.

Pathogen
This section has been translated automatically.

Human DNA virus from the herpes family (HHV-6 and 25% by HHV-7). S.u. Herpes viruses, human.

Manifestation
This section has been translated automatically.

Occurs in 95% of cases in the 6th month to 3 years before age; rarely in adulthood.

Clinical features
This section has been translated automatically.

Incubation period: 3-7 days. Start with fatigue, tiredness, possibly light or moderate sore throat; sudden (subitum) fever rise to 39-40 °C, critical drop after 3 days.

Fleeting pinkish exanthema, progressing centrifugally from the trunk to the extremities, usually avoiding the face, rubeoliform or morbilloidal. Lymphadenopathy, convulsions...

No enanthema. In adults analogous exanthema with lymphadenopathy.

In adults, primary infection is accompanied by a highly febrile clinical picture with maculo-papular exanthema, gastroenteritis, lymphadenopathy and possible complicative hepatitis and meningoencephalitis.

Laboratory
This section has been translated automatically.

Leukocytopenia, lymphocytosis, monocytosis. Detection of HHV-6 IgM and IgG antibodies.

Histology
This section has been translated automatically.

Relatively unspecific picture with a discrete, lymphocytic superficial dermatitis, discrete or also distinct erythrocyte extravasations, focal exocytosis.

Differential diagnosis
This section has been translated automatically.

Complication(s)
This section has been translated automatically.

Fulminant concomitant hepatitis and meningoencephalitis may occur (apparently more frequently in the rare primary infection in adulthood than in childhood).

External therapy
This section has been translated automatically.

Symptomatic with shaking mixtures.

Internal therapy
This section has been translated automatically.

Antipyretic measures such as paracetamol in age-appropriate dosages.

Literature
This section has been translated automatically.

  1. Fried I et al (2009) HHV-6 infection - not always a three-day fever. SDDG 7: 234-236
  2. Meigs JF, Pepper W (1870) A practical treatise of the diseases of children. Lindsay and Blakiston, Philadelphia, pp. 701-703 and 803-806
  3. Zahorsky J (1910) Roseola infantilitis. Pediatrics 22: 60-64
  4. Zahorsky J (1913) Roseola infantum. JAMA 61: 1446-1450

Disclaimer

Please ask your physician for a reliable diagnosis. This website is only meant as a reference.

Authors

Last updated on: 29.10.2020